Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy

Interventions

This page lists published intervention papers and reviews in which BCTs have been coded using BCTTv1

You can search for a paper by author, target behaviour or BCT. To search for a particular BCT, you can select one or more options from the drop-down list by clicking on ‘Filter by BCT’. You can also add new papers by clicking on ‘Add New Citation’. This must be a peer-reviewed intervention or review paper that is not already listed on the page, which has identified BCTs using BCTTv1. You will receive an email notification once the citation you add has been approved.

Showing results 1-5 of 338
  • Mobile Technology Interventions for Asthma Self-Management: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PMID: 28465281

    Mobile technology interventions (MTI) are becoming increasingly popular in the management of chronic health behaviors. Most MTI allow individuals to monitor medication use, record symptoms, or store and activate disease-management action plans. Therefore, MTI may have the potential to improve low adherence to medication and action plans for individuals with asthma, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes.

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of MTI on clinical outcomes as well as adherence in individuals with asthma. As the use of evidence-based behavior change techniques (BCT) has been shown to improve intervention effects, we also conducted exploratory analyses to determine the role of BCT and engagement with MTI as moderators of MTI efficacy.

    We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials up until June 2016. Random effect models were used to assess the effect of MTI on clinical outcomes as well as adherence to preventer medication or symptom monitoring. Mixed effects models assessed whether the features of the MTI (ie, use of BCT) and how often a person engaged with MTI moderated the effects of MTI.

    The literature search located 11 studies meeting the inclusion criteria, with 9 providing satisfactory data for meta-analysis. Compared with standard treatment, MTI had moderate to large effect sizes (Hedges g) on medication adherence and clinical outcomes. MTI had no additional effects on adherence or clinical outcomes when compared with paper-based monitoring. No moderator effects were found, and the number of studies was small. A narrative review of the two studies, which are not included in the meta-analysis, found similar results.

    This review indicated the efficacy of MTI for self-management in individuals with asthma and also indicated that MTI appears to be as efficacious as paper-based monitoring. This review also suggested a need for robust studies to examine the effects of BCT use and engagement on MTI efficacy to inform the evidence base for MTI in individuals with asthma.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Systematic Review
    Target behaviour: Self-Management Behaviours
    BCTs: 1.4 Action planning, 2.3 Self-monitoring of behavior, 2.6 Biofeedback, 2.7 Feedback on outcome(s) of behavior, 3.2 Social support (practical), 4.1 Instruction on how to perform a behavior, 5.1 Information about health consequences, 6.1 Demonstration of the behavior, 7.1 Prompts/cues

    Miller Lisa, Schüz Benjamin, Walters Julia, Walters E Haydn - JMIR mHealth and uHealth [5:e57] (2017)

  • The design of a theory-based intervention to improve medication adherence in chronic pain patients.

    PMID: 28394220

    Non-adherence to pain medication is common in chronic pain patients and may result in unfavorable treatment outcomes. Interventions to improve adherence behavior often fail to significantly change medication use. In this report, we describe the application of a theoretical psychological model of behavior change in order to design an intervention to improve medication adherence in chronic pain patients.

    This study applies the Behavior Change Wheel framework and the Behavior Change Techniques Taxonomy to design a theory-based intervention to improve pain medication use. Available literature was used to extract determinants of adherence in chronic pain patients.

    Selected target behaviors to improve medication adherence are: share agreement on follow up policy, monitor medication adherence, provide patient education routinely, discuss attitudes and concerns towards pain medication, develop medication taking habits and use medication reminders. The intervention consists of three components in which relevant behavior change techniques are applied: (1) changes in the electronic patient data management systems to enable medical staff to apply target behaviors; (2) bi-annual education of medical staff to commit the team to the proposed intervention and provide feedback; (3) routine and mandatory education of chronic pain patients following prescription of pain medication.

    To improve medication adherence in chronic pain patients, most interventions should be focused on providers of pain therapy. Prescribing chronic pain medication should be seen as part of a larger treatment regimen including adequate follow-up, adherence monitoring and patient education during the course of treatment.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Treatment/Medication Adherence
    BCTs: 1.1 Goal setting (behavior), 1.3 Goal setting (outcome), 1.4 Action planning, 1.9 Commitment, 2.2 Feedback on behavior, 2.3 Self-monitoring of behavior, 3.1 Social support (unspecified), 4.1 Instruction on how to perform a behavior, 5.1 Information about health consequences, 5.3 Information about social and environmental consequences, 7.1 Prompts/cues, 8.3 Habit formation, 9.1 Credible source, 12.1 Restructuring the physical environment, 12.5 Adding objects to the environment, 13.3 Incompatible beliefs

    Timmerman Leon, Stronks Dirk L, Huygen Frank J P M - Current medical research and opinion (2017)

  • Design of a Mobile App for Nutrition Education (TreC-LifeStyle) and Formative Evaluation With Families of Overweight Children.

    PMID: 28408361

    Nutrition and diet apps represent today a popular area of mobile health (mHealth), offering the possibility of delivering behavior change (BC) interventions for healthy eating and weight management in a scalable and cost-effective way. However, if commercial apps for pediatric weight management fail to retain users because of a lack of theoretical background and evidence-based content, mHealth apps that are more evidence-based are found less engaging and popular among consumers. Approaching the apps development process from a multidisciplinary and user-centered design (UCD) perspective is likely to help overcome these limitations, raising the chances for an easier adoption and integration of nutrition education apps within primary care interventions.

    The aim of this study was to describe the design and development of the TreC-LifeStyle nutrition education app and the results of a formative evaluation with families.

    The design of the nutrition education intervention was based on a multidisciplinary UCD approach, involving a team of BC experts, working with 2 nutritionists and 3 pediatricians from a primary care center. The app content was derived from evidence-based knowledge founded on the Food Pyramid and Mediterranean Diet guidelines used by pediatricians in primary care. A formative evaluation of the TreC-LifeStyle app involved 6 families of overweight children (aged 7-12 years) self-reporting daily food intake of children for 6 weeks and providing feedback on the user experience with the mHealth intervention. Analysis of the app's usage patterns during the intervention and of participants' feedback informed the refinement of the app design and a tuning of the nutrition education strategies to improve user engagement and compliance with the intervention.

    Design sessions with the contribution of pediatricians and nutritionists helped define the nutrition education app and intervention, providing an effective human and virtual coaching approach to raise parents' awareness about children's eating behavior and lifestyle. The 6 families participating in the pilot study found the app usable and showed high compliance with the intervention over the 6 weeks, but analysis of their interaction and feedback showed the need for improving some of the app features related to the BC techniques "monitoring of the behavior" and "information provision."

    The UCD and formative evaluation of TreC-LifeStyle show that nutrition education apps are feasible and acceptable solutions to support health promotion interventions in primary care.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Dietary Behaviours
    BCTs: 1.5 Review behavior goal(s), 2.1 Monitoring of behavior by others without feedback, 2.2 Feedback on behavior, 4.1 Instruction on how to perform a behavior, 7.1 Prompts/cues

    Gabrielli Silvia, Dianti Marco, Maimone Rosa, Betta Marta, Filippi Lorena, Ghezzi Monica, Forti Stefano - JMIR mHealth and uHealth [5:e48] (2017)

  • Applying the Theoretical Domains Framework to identify barriers and targeted interventions to enhance nurses' use of electronic medication management systems in two Australian hospitals.

    PMID: 28347319 PMCID: PMC5368903 DOI: 10.1186/s13012-017-0572-1

    Medication errors harm hospitalised patients and increase health care costs. Electronic Medication Management Systems (EMMS) have been shown to reduce medication errors. However, nurses do not always use EMMS as intended, largely because implementation of such patient safety strategies requires clinicians to change their existing practices, routines and behaviour. This study uses the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify barriers and targeted interventions to enhance nurses' appropriate use of EMMS in two Australian hospitals.

    This qualitative study draws on in-depth interviews with 19 acute care nurses who used EMMS. A convenience sampling approach was used. Nurses working on the study units (N = 6) in two hospitals were invited to participate if available during the data collection period. Interviews inductively explored nurses' experiences of using EMMS (step 1). Data were analysed using the TDF to identify theory-derived barriers to nurses' appropriate use of EMMS (step 2). Relevant behaviour change techniques (BCTs) were identified to overcome key barriers to using EMMS (step 3) followed by the identification of potential literature-informed targeted intervention strategies to operationalise the identified BCTs (step 4).

    Barriers to nurses' use of EMMS in acute care were represented by nine domains of the TDF. Two closely linked domains emerged as major barriers to EMMS use: Environmental Context and Resources (availability and properties of computers on wheels (COWs); technology characteristics; specific contexts; competing demands and time pressure) and Social/Professional Role and Identity (conflict between using EMMS appropriately and executing behaviours critical to nurses' professional role and identity). The study identified three potential BCTs to address the Environmental Context and Resources domain barrier: adding objects to the environment; restructuring the physical environment; and prompts and cues. Seven BCTs to address Social/Professional Role and Identity were identified: social process of encouragement; pressure or support; information about others' approval; incompatible beliefs; identification of self as role model; framing/reframing; social comparison; and demonstration of behaviour. It proposes several targeted interventions to deliver these BCTs.

    The TDF provides a useful approach to identify barriers to nurses' prescribed use of EMMS, and can inform the design of targeted theory-based interventions to improve EMMS implementation.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Health Professional Behaviours
    BCTs: 1.1 Goal setting (behavior), 3.2 Social support (practical), 6.1 Demonstration of the behavior, 6.2 Social comparison, 6.3 Information about others' approval, 7.1 Prompts/cues, 12.1 Restructuring the physical environment, 12.5 Adding objects to the environment, 13.1 Identification of self as role model, 13.2 Framing/reframing

    Debono Deborah, Taylor Natalie, Lipworth Wendy, Greenfield David, Travaglia Joanne, Black Deborah, Braithwaite Jeffrey - Implementation science : IS [12:42] (2017)

  • Can Communicating Personalised Disease Risk Promote Healthy Behaviour Change? A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews.

    PMID: 28290066

    The assessment and communication of disease risk that is personalised to the individual is widespread in healthcare contexts. Despite several systematic reviews of RCTs, it is unclear under what circumstances that personalised risk estimates promotes change in four key health-related behaviours: smoking, physical activity, diet and alcohol consumption.

    The present research aims to systematically identify, evaluate and synthesise the findings of existing systematic reviews.

    This systematic review of systematic reviews followed published guidance. A search of four databases and two-stage screening procedure with good reliability identified nine eligible systematic reviews.

    The nine reviews each included between three and 15 primary studies, containing 36 unique studies. Methods of personalising risk feedback included imaging/visual feedback, genetic testing, and numerical estimation from risk algorithms. The reviews were generally high quality. For a broad range of methods of estimating and communicating risk, the reviews found no evidence that risk information had strong or consistent effects on health-related behaviours. The most promising effects came from interventions using visual or imaging techniques and with smoking cessation and dietary behaviour as outcomes, but with inconsistent results. Few interventions explicitly used theory, few targeted self-efficacy or response efficacy, and a limited range of Behaviour Change Techniques were used.

    Presenting risk information on its own, even when highly personalised, does not produce strong effects on health-related behaviours or changes which are sustained. Future research in this area should build on the existing knowledge base about increasing the effects of risk communication on behaviour.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Systematic Review
    Target behaviour: Smoking
    BCTs: 1.1 Goal setting (behavior), 1.2 Problem solving, 1.3 Goal setting (outcome), 2.3 Self-monitoring of behavior, 5.1 Information about health consequences, 5.3 Information about social and environmental consequences, 10.11 Future punishment, 11.2 Reduce negative emotions, 13.3 Incompatible beliefs, 15.1 Verbal persuasion about capability

    French David P, Cameron Elaine, Benton Jack S, Deaton Christi, Harvie Michelle - Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (2017)

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The assessment and communication of disease risk that is personalised to the individual is widespread in healthcare contexts. Despite several systematic reviews of RCTs, it is unclear under what circumstances that personalised risk estimates promotes change in four key health-related behaviours: smoking, physical activity, diet and alcohol consumption.<\/p>

The present research aims to systematically identify, evaluate and synthesise the findings of existing systematic reviews.<\/p>

This systematic review of systematic reviews followed published guidance. A search of four databases and two-stage screening procedure with good reliability identified nine eligible systematic reviews.<\/p>

The nine reviews each included between three and 15 primary studies, containing 36 unique studies. Methods of personalising risk feedback included imaging\/visual feedback, genetic testing, and numerical estimation from risk algorithms. The reviews were generally high quality. For a broad range of methods of estimating and communicating risk, the reviews found no evidence that risk information had strong or consistent effects on health-related behaviours. The most promising effects came from interventions using visual or imaging techniques and with smoking cessation and dietary behaviour as outcomes, but with inconsistent results. Few interventions explicitly used theory, few targeted self-efficacy or response efficacy, and a limited range of Behaviour Change Techniques were used.<\/p>

Presenting risk information on its own, even when highly personalised, does not produce strong effects on health-related behaviours or changes which are sustained. 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