Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy

Interventions

This page lists published intervention papers and reviews in which BCTs have been coded using BCTTv1

You can search for a paper by author, target behaviour or BCT. To search for a particular BCT, you can select one or more options from the drop-down list by clicking on ‘Filter by BCT’. You can also add new papers by clicking on ‘Add New Citation’. This must be a peer-reviewed intervention or review paper that is not already listed on the page, which has identified BCTs using BCTTv1. You will receive an email notification once the citation you add has been approved.

Showing results 1-5 of 342
  • Randomised controlled trial of a text messaging intervention for reducing processed meat consumption: The mediating roles of anticipated regret and intention.

    PMID: 28651971

    The present study aimed to extend the literature on text messaging interventions involved in promoting healthy eating behaviours. The theoretical framework was the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). A randomized controlled trial was used to test the impact of daily text messages compared to no message (groups) for reducing processed meat consumption (PMC) over a 2 week period, testing the sequential mediation role of anticipated regret and intention on the relationship between groups and PMC reduction. PMC and TPB variables were assessed both at Time 1 and Time 2. Participants were Italian undergraduates (at Time 1 N = 124) randomly allocated to control and message condition groups. Undergraduates in the message condition group received a daily SMS, which focused on anticipated regret and urged them to self-monitor PMC. Participants in the control group did not receive any message. Those who completed all measures at both time points were included in the analyses (N = 112). Findings showed that a daily messaging intervention, controlling for participants' past behaviour, reduced self-reported consumption of PMC. Mediation analyses indicated partial serial mediation via anticipated regret and intentions. The current study provided support for the efficacy of a daily messaging intervention targeting anticipated regret and encouraging self-monitoring in decreasing PMC. Outcomes showed the important mediating role of anticipated regret and intentions for reducing PMC.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Dietary Behaviours
    BCTs: 1.1 Goal setting (behavior), 1.5 Review behavior goal(s), 2.2 Feedback on behavior, 2.3 Self-monitoring of behavior, 5.1 Information about health consequences, 5.3 Information about social and environmental consequences, 5.5 Anticipated regret, 5.6 Information about emotional consequences, 6.1 Demonstration of the behavior, 8.7 Graded tasks, 15.1 Verbal persuasion about capability

    Carfora V, Caso D, Conner M - Appetite [117:152-160] (2017)

  • Comparing motivational, self-regulatory and habitual processes in a computer-tailored physical activity intervention in hospital employees - protocol for the PATHS randomised controlled trial.

    PMID: 28549476 PMCID: PMC5446723 DOI: 10.1186/s12889-017-4415-4

    Most people do not engage in sufficient physical activity to confer health benefits and to reduce risk of chronic disease. Healthcare professionals frequently provide guidance on physical activity, but often do not meet guideline levels of physical activity themselves. The main objective of this study is to develop and test the efficacy of a tailored intervention to increase healthcare professionals' physical activity participation and quality of life, and to reduce work-related stress and absenteeism. This is the first study to compare the additive effects of three forms of a tailored intervention using different techniques from behavioural theory, which differ according to their focus on motivational, self-regulatory and/or habitual processes.

    Healthcare professionals (N = 192) will be recruited from four hospitals in Perth, Western Australia, via email lists, leaflets, and posters to participate in the four group randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to one of four conditions: (1) education only (non-tailored information only), (2) education plus intervention components to enhance motivation, (3) education plus components to enhance motivation and self-regulation, and (4) education plus components to enhance motivation, self-regulation and habit formation. All intervention groups will receive a computer-tailored intervention administered via a web-based platform and will receive supporting text-messages containing tailored information, prompts and feedback relevant to each condition. All outcomes will be assessed at baseline, and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome assessed in this study is physical activity measured using activity monitors. Secondary outcomes include: quality of life, stress, anxiety, sleep, and absenteeism. Website engagement, retention, preferences and intervention fidelity will also be evaluated as well as potential mediators and moderators of intervention effect.

    This is the first study to examine a tailored, technology-supported intervention aiming to increase physical activity in healthcare professionals. The study will evaluate whether including additional theory-based behaviour change techniques aimed at promoting motivation, self-regulation and habit will lead to increased physical activity participation relative to information alone. The online platform developed in this study has potential to deliver efficient, scalable and personally-relevant intervention that can be translated to other occupational settings.

    Australian New-Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12616000462482, submitted 29/03/2016, prospectively registered 8/04/2016.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Physical Activity
    BCTs: 1.1 Goal setting (behavior), 1.2 Problem solving, 1.3 Goal setting (outcome), 1.4 Action planning, 1.5 Review behavior goal(s), 1.6 Discrepancy between current behavior and goal, 1.7 Review outcome goal(s), 2.2 Feedback on behavior, 2.7 Feedback on outcome(s) of behavior, 3.2 Social support (practical), 3.3 Social support (emotional), 5.1 Information about health consequences, 5.4 Monitoring of emotional consequences, 5.5 Anticipated regret, 5.6 Information about emotional consequences, 7.1 Prompts/cues, 7.3 Reduce prompts/cues, 8.1 Behavioral practice/ rehearsal, 8.2 Behavior substitution, 8.3 Habit formation, 8.4 Habit reversal, 9.2 Pros and cons, 10.9 Self-reward, 11.2 Reduce negative emotions, 12.2 Restructuring the social environment, 12.3 Avoidance/reducing exposure to cues for the behavior, 13.3 Incompatible beliefs, 15.1 Verbal persuasion about capability

    Kwasnicka Dominika, Vandelanotte Corneel, Rebar Amanda, Gardner Benjamin, Short Camille, Duncan Mitch, Crook Dawn, Hagger Martin S - BMC public health [17:518] (2017)

  • Development of an Evidence-Informed Blog to Promote Healthy Eating Among Mothers: Use of the Intervention Mapping Protocol.

    PMID: 28526669 PMCID: PMC5457529 DOI: 10.2196/resprot.7147

    Low adherence to dietary guidelines and a concurrent rise of obesity-related chronic diseases emphasize the need for effective interventions to promote healthy eating. There is growing recognition that behavior change interventions should draw on theories of behavior change. Online interventions grounded in theory lead to increased effectiveness for health behavior change; however, few theory-driven social media-based health promotion interventions have been described in the literature.

    The objective of this study was to describe the application of the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol to develop an evidence-informed blog to promote healthy eating among French-Canadian mothers of preschool and school-aged children.

    The following six steps of the IM protocol were performed. In Step 1, a preliminary needs assessment included a literature search on theoretical domains predicting Vegetables and Fruits intakes and Milk and Alternatives intakes in adults (ie, knowledge, beliefs about capabilities, beliefs about consequences, intention/goals) and a qualitative study including focus groups to identify female Internet users' perceptions of their use of healthy eating blogs. In Step 2, two behavioral outcomes were selected (ie, increase daily intakes of Vegetables and Fruits and Milk and Alternatives of mothers to reach Canadian dietary recommendations) and subsequently divided into six performance objectives inspired by national and international dietary recommendations such as planning for healthy meals. A matrix of change objectives was then created by crossing performance objectives with theoretical domains predicting Vegetables and Fruits intakes and Milk and Alternatives intakes in adults. Step 3 consisted of selecting theory-based intervention methods (eg, modeling and goal setting) and translating them into practical applications for the context of a dietary intervention delivered through a blog. A 6-month intervention was developed in Step 4 in which we aimed to address one performance objective per month in weekly blog publications written by a registered dietitian. For Step 5, we sought to include engagement-promoting methods (eg, peer and counselor support) to promote mothers' use of the blog and adherence to the intervention. Finally in Step 6, a randomized controlled trial has been launched to evaluate the effects of the blog on dietary behaviors of French-Canadian mothers.

    The intervention study is expected to be completed in March 2018.

    An intervention mapping protocol allowed for effective decision making in the development of a novel knowledge translation tool to increase adherence to dietary recommendations among mothers of preschool and school-aged children.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Dietary Behaviours
    BCTs: 1.1 Goal setting (behavior), 1.5 Review behavior goal(s), 2.2 Feedback on behavior, 5.1 Information about health consequences, 5.3 Information about social and environmental consequences, 5.6 Information about emotional consequences, 6.1 Demonstration of the behavior, 8.7 Graded tasks, 13.3 Incompatible beliefs, 15.1 Verbal persuasion about capability

    Dumas Audrée-Anne, Lemieux Simone, Lapointe Annie, Provencher Véronique, Robitaille Julie, Desroches Sophie - JMIR research protocols [6:e92] (2017)

  • Increasing intention to cook from basic ingredients: A randomised controlled study.

    PMID: 28526477

    The promotion of home cooking is a strategy used to improve diet quality and health. However, modern home cooking typically includes the use of processed food which can lead to negative outcomes including weight gain. In addition, interventions to improve cooking skills do not always explain how theory informed their design and implementation. The Behaviour Change Technique (BCT) taxonomy successfully employed in other areas has identified essential elements for interventions. This study investigated the effectiveness of different instructional modes for learning to cook a meal, designed using an accumulating number of BCTs, on participant's perceived difficulty, enjoyment, confidence and intention to cook from basic ingredients. 141 mothers aged between 20 and 39 years from the island of Ireland were randomised to one of four conditions based on BCTs (1) recipe card only [control condition]; (2) recipe card plus video modelling; (3) recipe card plus video prompting; (4) recipe card plus video elements. Participants rated their enjoyment, perceived difficulty, confidence and intention to cook again pre, mid and post experiment. Repeated one-way factorial ANOVAs, correlations and a hierarchical regression model were conducted. Despite no significant differences between the different conditions, there was a significant increase in enjoyment (P < 0.001), confidence (P < 0.001) and intention to cook from basics again (P < 0.001) and a decrease in perceived difficulty (P = 0.001) after the experiment in all conditions. Intention to cook from basics pre-experiment, and confidence and enjoyment (both pre and post experiment) significantly contributed to the final regression model explaining 42% of the variance in intention to cook from basics again. Cooking interventions should focus on practical cooking and increasing participants' enjoyment and confidence during cooking to increase intention to cook from basic ingredients at home.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Dietary Behaviours
    BCTs: 4.1 Instruction on how to perform a behavior, 6.1 Demonstration of the behavior, 8.1 Behavioral practice/ rehearsal, 8.7 Graded tasks

    Lavelle Fiona, Hollywood Lynsey, Caraher Martin, McGowan Laura, Spence Michelle, Surgenor Dawn, McCloat Amanda, Mooney Elaine, Raats Monique, Dean Moira - Appetite [116:502-510] (2017)

  • Using a mobile health application to reduce alcohol consumption: a mixed-methods evaluation of the drinkaware track & calculate units application.

    PMID: 28511698 PMCID: PMC5434584 DOI: 10.1186/s12889-017-4358-9

    Smartphone applications ("apps") offer promise as tools to help people monitor and reduce their alcohol consumption. To date, few evaluations of alcohol reduction apps exist, with even fewer considering apps already available to the public. The aim of this study was to evaluate an existing publically available app, designed by Drinkaware, a UK-based alcohol awareness charity.

    We adopted a mixed-methods design, analysing routinely collected app usage data to explore user characteristics and patterns of usage. Following this, in-depth interviews were conducted with a sub-sample of app users to examine perceptions of acceptability, usability and perceived effectiveness, as well as to provide recommendations on how to improve the app.

    One hundred nineteen thousand seven hundred thirteen people downloaded and entered data into the app over a 13-month period. High attrition was observed after 1 week. Users who engaged with the app tended to be "high risk" drinkers and to report being motivated "to reduce drinking" at the point of first download. In those who consistently engaged with the app over time, self-reported alcohol consumption levels reduced, with most change occurring in the first week of usage. Our qualitative findings indicate satisfaction with the usability of the app, but mixed feedback was given regarding individual features. Users expressed conflicting views concerning the type of feedback and notifications that the app currently provides. A common preference was expressed for more personalised content.

    The Drinkaware app is a useful tool to support behaviour change in individuals who are already motivated and committed to reducing their alcohol consumption. The Drinkaware app would benefit from greater personalisation and tailoring to promote longer term use. This evaluation provides insight into the usability and acceptability of various app features and contains a number of recommendations for improving user satisfaction and the potential effectiveness of apps designed to encourage reductions in alcohol consumption.

    Show Abstract
    Type:
    Intervention
    Target behaviour: Alcohol Use
    BCTs: 1.1 Goal setting (behavior), 1.4 Action planning, 2.2 Feedback on behavior, 2.3 Self-monitoring of behavior, 2.7 Feedback on outcome(s) of behavior, 5.1 Information about health consequences, 10.4 Social reward, 12.3 Avoidance/reducing exposure to cues for the behavior, 13.3 Incompatible beliefs

    Attwood Sophie, Parke Hannah, Larsen John, Morton Katie L - BMC public health [17:394] (2017)

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Smartphone applications (\\\"apps\\\") offer promise as tools to help people monitor and reduce their alcohol consumption. To date, few evaluations of alcohol reduction apps exist, with even fewer considering apps already available to the public. The aim of this study was to evaluate an existing publically available app, designed by Drinkaware, a UK-based alcohol awareness charity.<\/p>

We adopted a mixed-methods design, analysing routinely collected app usage data to explore user characteristics and patterns of usage. Following this, in-depth interviews were conducted with a sub-sample of app users to examine perceptions of acceptability, usability and perceived effectiveness, as well as to provide recommendations on how to improve the app.<\/p>

One hundred nineteen thousand seven hundred thirteen people downloaded and entered data into the app over a 13-month period. High attrition was observed after 1 week. Users who engaged with the app tended to be \\\"high risk\\\" drinkers and to report being motivated \\\"to reduce drinking\\\" at the point of first download. In those who consistently engaged with the app over time, self-reported alcohol consumption levels reduced, with most change occurring in the first week of usage. Our qualitative findings indicate satisfaction with the usability of the app, but mixed feedback was given regarding individual features. Users expressed conflicting views concerning the type of feedback and notifications that the app currently provides. A common preference was expressed for more personalised content.<\/p>

The Drinkaware app is a useful tool to support behaviour change in individuals who are already motivated and committed to reducing their alcohol consumption. The Drinkaware app would benefit from greater personalisation and tailoring to promote longer term use. 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